David Bowie 2004-04-17 Berkley ,Community Theatre SQ 8,5

David Bowie 2004-04-17 Berkley ,Community Theatre SQ 8,5

101. Crowd / Walk On.flac
102. Rebel Rebel.flac
103. New Killer Star.flac
104. Looking For Water.flac
105. Cactus.flac
106. Reality.flac
107. All The Young Dudes.flac
108. China Girl.flac
109. A New Career In A New Town.flac
110. The Motel.flac
111. The Loneliest Guy.flac
112. Panic In Detroit.flac
113. Let’s Dance.flac
114. The Man Who Sold The World.flac
115. The Supermen.flac
216. Sunday.flac
217. Heathen (The Rays).flac
218. Introduction / Crowd.flac
219. Under Pressure.flac
220. Days.flac
221. Always Crashing In The Same Car.flac
222. Pablo Picasso.flac
223. Ashes To Ashes.flac
224. Quicksand.flac
225. Hang On To Yourself.flac
226. “Heroes”.flac
227. crow.flac
ENCORE
228. Bring Me The Disco King.flac
229. Five Years.flac
230. Suffragette City.flac
231. Ziggy Stardust.flac

at822>m1 row f seat 65
r300>(coax)dio2448>sf6.0>cdwav>flac

solid aud, far from spectacular, good show

Much of that intensity was due to Bowie’s sheer presence, which was the single focus of the show, despite a few interesting video effects. And Bowie lived up to that focus, looking literally half his age. His hair highlighted and fashionably tousled, he wore a tattered purple, violet and black suit (with yellow tie) that made him look like a dandy gone AWOL from Napoleon’s army. While his peer, friend and sometime collaborator Mick Jagger looks lean but wizened, Bowie still looks remarkably fresh.

On the other hand, bringing the show down to theater size without decreasing the volume was brutal on some listeners’ ears and hard, too, on the music: Bowie’s voice often seemed lost in the compressed thunder of the low frequencies, and a lot of the subtleties of the music were swallowed up in the din.

Admittedly, though, this is not a problem unique to Bowie – aging sound men, their low frequencies damaged by years on the road, seem determined to take audiences with them into premature deafness. Still, it was a shame Bowie can’t hear what the audience had to put up with.

But Bowie was, for the most part, focused on rocking. While his records and some past tours have shown the remarkable creative breadth of his work, this show focuses on his harder-hitting, less-subtle material, though songs such as “Quicksand” (from 1971) and the contemporary “Slip Away” brought the intensity down a couple of notches and opened things up.

There were some extraordinary moments: His duet with Dorsey on “Under Pressure,” originally recorded with Queen, was explosive, with Dorsey managing the late Freddie Mercury’s quasi-operatic vocals with aplomb. And the locomotive drive of the latter-day “I’m Afraid of Americans” came off like trip-hop as done by Metallica.

Old favorites such as “Ashes to Ashes” and “Suffragette City” drew in the initially unresponsive Bay Area fans, loosened them up and inspired some impassioned singalongs, especially on “Suffragette City’s” classic payoff line, “Ahhhhhhhh … wham bam, thank you ma’am.”

Musicians:
David Bowie, vocals, guitar, harmonica
Earl Slick, guitar
Gerry Leonard, guitar
Gail Ann Dorsey, bass, backing vocals
Sterling Campbell, drums
Mike Garson, piano
Catherine Russel, guitar, percussion,backing vocals

.

(Visited 148 times, 1 visits today)