David Bowie 1995-09-27 East Rutherford ,Meadowlands Arena - SQ -8

David Bowie 1995-09-27 East Rutherford ,Meadowlands Arena .
Sound Quality Rating

Nine Inch Nails & David Bowie set
01. Eraser (instrumental).flac
02. Subterraneans.flac
03. Scary Monsters.flac
04. Reptile.flac
05. Hallo Spaceboy.flac
06. Hurt.flac

David Bowie setlist
07. The Heart’s Filthy Lesson.flac
08. I’m Deranged.flac
09. The Voyeur of Utter Destruction (As Beauty).flac
10. I Have Not Been to Oxford Town.flac
11. We Prick You.flac
12. A Small Plot of Land.flac
13. Look Back In Anger.flac
14. Breaking Glass.flac
15. Outside.flac
16. Andy Warhol.flac
17. The Man Who Sold the World.flac
18. Nite Flights.flac
19. Jump They Say.flac
20. Band Introductions.flac
21. Under Pressure.flac
22. Joe the Lion.flac

Label : No label
Audio Source : Audience recording
Lineage : Unknown
Taping Gear : Unknown
Taper: Unknown
Recording Location: Unknown
Total running time : 1:38:02
Sound Quality : Much noise ,dull ,but still good listened to
Attendance : Unknown
Artwork : None

David play for the first time Look Back In Anger and Under Pressure

Someone threw flowers on the stage during We Prick On You

Review: ‘David Bowie; Nine Inch Nails’

Unfortunately, this attention to uniforms extends to the nearly 50-year-old Bowie himself, decked out in the requisite leather and rubberwear. The idea is clearly to reach out to a new generation, but most NINers and Bowiephiles alike were plainly bewildered.

Unfortunately, this attention to uniforms extends to the nearly 50-year-old Bowie himself, decked out in the requisite leather and rubberwear. The idea is clearly to reach out to a new generation, but most NINers and Bowiephiles alike were plainly bewildered.

Not helping any is the strong focus on Bowie’s new album, “Outside” (Virgin). Purportedly the first in a five-disc set, it’s a concept album about ritual art-murders at the close of the century, with the attendant techno and industrial elements in place. Relatively uncompromising, it’s Bowie’s strongest (and most willfully strange) album in some 15 years — and the lack of familiar music leaves most of the audience scratching its collective head.

Bowie’s previous reinvention, as head of guitar-racket outfit Tin Machine, was patterned after the then-au courant likes of the Pixies. While that group kept its distance, NIN’s Reznor has fully welcomed the endorsement, with his and Bowie’s band playing together for four songs in an effective, intermission-less segue between acts.

The intriguing keyboard-based cross-rhythms of NIN’s records were mostly obliterated during the group’s opening half-hour, which concentrated on a thundering wall-of-noise approach for “Down In It” and “Burn.” Melody began to leak through during “Sanctified,” climaxing with a radically metallic “Closer.”

It was a smart move, gradually weaning the crowd from pure mosh madness to more traditional stylings, in preparation for the headliner. Bowie then appeared for a fiercely convincing “Scary Monsters” and his own new “Hallo Spaceboy,” interspersed with NIN’s “Reptile.”

Highlighting the summit was a marvelous duet on Reznor’s epic ballad of betrayal, “Hurt.” The two singers swapped verses, then joined for a thrillingly fervent chorus.

With that, NIN exited, and so did many concertgoers. Bowie opted for the “take your medicine first” method, playing only the unfamiliar “Outside” material before delving into the back catalog for a grab-bag of earlier tunes. Of the new songs, the Eno-influenced funk of “The Hearts Filthy Lesson” and the vaguely cheerful marching-to-Armageddon anthem “I Have Not Been to Oxford Town” stood out.

Bowie’s three 1970s albums with Eno (who appears throughout the new disc) –“Low,””Heroes” and “Lodger”– were acknowledged on this night, with a punky version of “Breaking Glass,” a pumping “Joe the Lion” and charging “Look Back in Anger.”

The band — including on-again, off-again stalwarts like guitarist Carlos Alomar and singer/keyboardist George Simms — was consistently strong, if not particularly inspired. Reeves Gabrels, former axeman for Tin Machine, spun out appropriately Robert Fripp-styled guitar solos throughout.

This is an admirably bold move for Bowie (though one suspects Virgin has its work cut out), and yet another validation for NIN — which likely will be headlining on its own next time around.

Kevin Zimmerman ,SEPTEMBER 29, 1995 | 12:00AM PT

David Bowie Tour band 1995-1996 – Outside Tour
The Outside Tour was a tour by English rock musician David Bowie, opening on 14 September 1995 at Meadows Music Theatre – Hartford, Connecticut. Support during the US leg of the tour was provided by Nine Inch Nails, who segued their set with Bowie’s to form a continuous show. Prick opened the first date of the tour. Morrissey was the support act for the European leg, but withdrew from the tour after nine dates. On selected dates Reeves Gabrels performed songs from his album, The Sacred Squall of Now in addition to performing with Nine Inch Nails and David Bowie. The opening of the concert tour preceded the release of the 1. Outside album which was released on 25 September 1995.

David Bowie – vocals
Reeves Gabrels – guitar
Carlos Alomar – guitar, backing vocals
Gail Ann Dorsey – bass guitar, vocals
Zack Alford – drums
Mike Garson – piano
Peter Schwartz – synthesizer, musical director
George Simms – backing vocals, keyboards

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