David Bowie 1978-11-11 Adelaide ,Oval Cricket Ground - Adelaide 1978 - (2019 uxbridge 985) - SQ -8

David Bowie 1978-11-11 Adelaide ,Oval Cricket Ground – Adelaide 1978 – (2019 uxbridge 985).
Sound Quality Rating

101. Intro.flac
102. Warszawa.flac
103. “Heroes”.flac
104. What In The World.flac
105. Be My Wife.flac
106. The Jean Genie.flac
107. Blackout.flac
108. Sense Of Doubt.flac
109. Breaking Glass.flac
110. Fame.flac
111. Beauty And The Beast.flac
201. Five Years.flac
202. Soul Love.flac
203. Star.flac
204. Hang Onto Yourself.flac
205. Ziggy Stardust.flac
206. Suffragette City.flac
207. Art Decade.flac
208. Alabama Song.flac
209. Station To Station.flac
210. TVC 15.flac
211. Stay.flac
212. Rebel Rebel.flac

Label: Uxbridge – 985 (released 2019)
Audio Source: audience
Lineage:
Total running time: 1:45:16
Sound Quality : noise ,dull ,but still good listened to
Attendance: 20.000
Artwork: Yes

“Thank you very much. l’d like to say how pleased and thankful we are that you’ve made us so much at home” Bowie says. Roger Powell had prior commitments to Utopia and could not come. He was replaced by an “Australian who came in at the last minute and has done an amazing role – Dennis Garcia!”.

Towards the end, backing singer Carlos was losing his voice and David forgot some of the words in Station to Station. But we stormed through the encores.”

 david-bowie-Adelaide-1978-Front - Inner david-bowie-Adelaide-1978-Tray - Outer  david-bowie-Adelaide-1978-Tray - Inner

Tour band 1978 – The Low and Heroes World Tour :
David Bowie – vocals, chamberlain
Adrian Belew – lead guitar, backing vocals
Carlos Alomar – rhythm guitar, backing vocals (music director)
George Murray – bass guitar, backing vocals
Dennis Davis – drums, percussion
Roger Powell – keyboards, synthesizer ,Moog Taurus bass pedals ,backing vocals (except 11–14 November 1978)
Dennis Garcia – keyboards, synthesizer (11–14 November 1978 only)
Sean Mayes – piano, string ensemble, backing vocals Simon House – electric violin
Simon House – electric violin.

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info BowieDownunder.com > http://www.bowiedownunder.com
Being the first concert on the new part of the tour, there was the question of what might be played. Despite having tour reports of overseas concerts, it was not certain whether Bowie would maintain something similar…

“As the light began to fade support band, The Angels, who were playing to a home crowd, entertained, and were warmly welcomed.
It seemed an age between The Angels finishing and a group of musicians walking quietly on to stage and the opening bars of “Warsawa” sounding.
At least in youth, there’s a strong impact of seeing someone who has been admired in the flesh for the first time. They seem larger than life, almost magical.
For me, that Adelaide concert on Saturday November 11 was magical. A short visit to Adelaide airport the next day secured autographs of the some of the band.”

~ Colin M, Bowie fan, 2011.

As it turned out, the repertoire in Adelaide remained almost identical to the previous leg of the tour – focusing on material from Low and “Heroes”, although ‘Speed of Life’ had now been dropped. The set was effectively divided in two – Bowie announcing:

“We’re just going off for 10 minutes….and when we come back….we won’t be wearing any slippers”.

Sean Mayes recalled that the crowd was particularly vocal in the second half:

“People were throwing streamers on-stage, also a sparkler, a camera sling … and a blue puppet wearing a DEVO badge.

Towards the end, Carlos was losing his voice and David forgot some of the words in ‘Station to Station’. But we stormed through the encores….”.

The blue puppet, incidentally, was Bruce Butler’s Grover doll. It sat aloft Sean’s piano for most of the concert (having been placed there by Bowie).
After the gig, the band went to what was described as “a posh but boring nightclub”.

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Posted on January 01, 0001 by Rodney Magazinovic

November 11, 1978 and David Bowie played not only his first show in Southern Hemisphere but also his first large scale solo outdoor gig.

The venue was the picturesque Adelaide Oval.

OPEN GALLERY

In his diary of the 1978 tour, keyboardist Sean Mayes suggested that the Oval provided a great relief after many concrete stadiums and catacomb dressing rooms on their more hectic US and European tours.

He also reflected on Adelaide as a city, “Adelaide was a strange city to my English eyes. The streets were wide like an American town but the buildings were like a European town.”

Being the first concert on the new part of the tour, there was the question of what might be played. Despite having tour reports of overseas concerts, it was not certain whether Bowie would maintain something similar…

Bowie fan Colin M who was there recalls, “As the light began to fade support band, The Angels, who were playing to a home crowd, entertained, and were warmly welcomed.

“It seemed an age between The Angels finishing and a group of musicians walking quietly on to stage and the opening bars of “Warsawa” sounding.

“At least in youth, there’s a strong impact of seeing someone who has been admired in the flesh for the first time. They seem larger than life, almost magical.

“For me, that Adelaide concert on Saturday November 11 was magical. A short visit to Adelaide airport the next day secured autographs of the some of the band.”

As it turned out, the repertoire in Adelaide remained almost identical to the previous leg of the tour – focusing on material from Low and Heroes, although Speed of Life had now been dropped. The set was effectively divided in two with Bowie announcing:

“We’re just going off for 10 minutes…and when we come back…we won’t be wearing any slippers”.

Mayes also recalled that the crowd was particularly vocal in the second half:

“People were throwing streamers on-stage, also a sparkler, a camera sling… and a blue puppet wearing a DEVO badge.

Towards the end, backing singer Carlos was losing his voice and David forgot some of the words in Station to Station. But we stormed through the encores.”

After the gig, the band went to what was described as “a posh but boring nightclub”.

Bowie’s reputation for being a decent, approachable bloke was affirmed by local music scene icon “Poster” George Jankovic.

He recalls meeting Bowie while working at the concert, “I was wiring under the stage. Bowie came down to introduce himself to me and we had a chat. He went out of his way to talk to a lot of people behind the scenes.”

The gig was also the first that Jankovic postered around Adelaide, a career he has done so successfully for the past 38 years it has earnt him his nickname!

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